A drugged society?

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At least one airlines staff tests positive for drugs everyday or every time a test is conducted.

(Mis)handling the SMU issue

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For a large number of Bhutanese who graduated from Sikkim Manipal University (SMU) these past few months have been living in the roil and torment of the time. The small hope that the prime minister offered them four months ago, that their degree would be recognised, has hit the wall straight and come to naught. The government’s stand now is: there is nothing that can be done about it. They, the graduates, feel vastly cheated and lied to because that’s the only feeling they can have in such a situation.

Driving towards a gridlock?

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The central bank’s decision to tighten vehicle loans is a good move. A decision such as this should have come sooner given the situation we are in. Records with the Road Safety and Transport Authority show that we bought about 24 cars everyday in 2016.

Mend the road

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Road widening project on the East-West highway is making travel increasingly difficult. Last week, a dozen public transport operators submitted a petition to the Road Safety and Transport Authority (RSTA) that said they would be compelled to suspend the services until the highway becomes pliable.

The need for responsible parties

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The Election Commission of Bhutan’s decision to refuse registration of Druk Kuenphen Tshogpa has set the bar high for aspiring political parties. In vetting the aspiring party for its capabilities in terms of leadership, competence and readiness to participate in the country’s democratic process, the commission’s candid observation has shown that forming a political party is a serious and a sacred responsibility.

It’s been wait a little too long

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The Cabinet has been sitting for far too long on the specialist retention strategy or proposal that the health ministry put up early this year through the Royal Civil Service Commission.

​Blame game must stop

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The Office of the Attorney General withdrawing cases for want of defendants is disturbing. That the courts asked the prosecutors to do so is as much troubling.

Some thoughts as we head back to school

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Good news there have been aplenty and not-so-good ones too. Heavy rains broke our levees and washed away our roads and bridges. Conduits cut, challenges myriad were thrown at us to wade through. And we did.

Ruling a change

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In setting a precedent with its judgment, the Supreme Court has filled a grave lacuna that our legislature had overlooked.

Dealing with our waste

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Waste is a problem in our society. In the bigger towns like Thimphu and Phuentsholing, the pressure of population growth is making collection and dumping of waste a colossal challenge. In the years ahead, if we do not from now on have measures in the train, the problem will mount to the extent that managing them will be impossible.

Honour the people and laws

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It took alleged grievances and frustrations to dissolve the House Committee of the National Assembly. It took a letter from the Speaker citing the act as a violation of laws to reinstate the House Committee.

The spectacle called drayangs

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The concept of drayangs tends to conjure varying notions. To some, the mere existence of drayangs threatens our culture and tradition while others argue that drayangs play a role in the promotion and preservation of these values. Somehow, in this conversation that dwells from cultural to moral policing to image crisis, we appear to overlook the concerns of the women who work in these places.

E.Coli in our rivers should shake us to action

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Water quality tests along the Wanhchhu and Pachhu have found traces of E.Coli, a bacterium that lives in the digestive tracts of humans and animals. Although many of the types are considered generally harmless, some strains can cause bloody diarrhoea, urinary tract infection, severe anaemia, or kidney failure that can lead to death.