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Nima | Gelephu

His Royal Highness Prince Jigyel Ugyen Wangchuck graced the inauguration of the Sengyechhu irrigation project at Tashicholing in Sarpang yesterday.

The project will also provide drinking water to the chiwog, especially in winter.

With the completion of the integrated irrigation projects, the farmers from Tashicholing are hopeful that they would be able to do paddy plantation on time and also focus on winter vegetable production.

Karma Wangzom from Tashicholing said that she could use only two acres of land for farming because of shortage of water. “It is not much of a problem in summer.”

Taraythang gup, Narayan Neopany, said the project would benefit all the households in Tashicholing.

He added that the farmers in Tashicholing were provided with an open irrigation canal. “It was damaged during development works. We have got pipe irrigation that would help farmers both in summer and winter.”

Started as the ninth water project under De-Suung National Service in March, the project was constructed with the help of 35 De-suups, officials from Umling drungkhag and officials from the Royal Bhutan Army.

The de-suups were awarded service pins and the engineers, technicians, and skilled labourers of the project were recognised with certificates yesterday. The project was completed in six months.

The project involved the construction of two intake tanks, a 100-meter approach canal, a sand trap, collection chambers, an RCC reservoir tank, and a distribution network.

To ensure the project is taken care of after the completion, handing-taking between the dzongkhag and Chuyur tshogpa from the chiwog was also conducted yesterday.

Chairperson of the tshogpa, Sonam Choejay, said the group would take care of the canal.

One of the participants of the project, Namgay Dorji, said the project gave de-suups a wide range of experiences within six months.

“I feel proud after seeing the results. I also learned skills related to civil works,” he said.

The estimated cost of construction was Nu 10.6 million.

Edited by Jigme Wangchuk




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