Cabinet submits details against secretaries to RCSC

Update: The Cabinet yesterday submitted the details and evidences of the charges it had made against the three government secretaries to the Royal Civil Service Commission, just before the deadline ended at 4pm.

Civil service commission officials confirmed receiving the details in a sealed envelope just before the two weeks time the commission had given to the Cabinet for submission.

The commission on December 29 has asked the Cabinet for details and evidences of the charges against the secretaries for them to investigate the case. Without the details, the commission had conveyed to the Cabinet that it was not in a position to accept the “surrendering of the secretaries.”

Citing the legal provisions of the Constitution, the Civil Service Act of Bhutan, 2010, and the Bhutan Civil Service Rules and Regulations, 2012, the commission had informed the Cabinet that, “the three Secretaries in question will remain on authorised absence with benefits until the matter is resolved.

A month ago, the Cabinet had surrendered Cabinet secretary, Dasho Penden Wangchuk, economic affairs secretary, Dasho Sonam Tshering, and the foreign secretary, Yeshey Dorji, for RCSC’s action, or until the completion of the Anti-Corruption Commission’s (ACC) investigation.

According to the Cabinet, the economic affairs secretary has misused the institution of the Committee of Secretaries to raise, discuss and take action on allegations made on him by a foreign magazine.

The foreign secretary is said to have misrepresented the government by sending a formal letter to the Government of India without the approval of the foreign minister or the Prime Minister, while the Cabinet Secretary was charged for not keeping the Prime Minister informed of the Committee of Secretaries’ discussions and decisions.

4 replies
  1. sibidai
    sibidai says:

    Its a matter of understanding and which side of fence one views it from.. for those who think RCSC did the right thing this interpretation and precedence will certainly boomerang sooner if not later and by then probably it will be too late for constitutional provision to straighten it.
    However, it just shows Bhutan does have a unique ‘democratic setup and practice’ – with no parallels elsewhere : a non-judicial entity to be able to query lawmakers’ decision.
    Besides unlike other ‘democracies,’ Bhutan does have the provision to fall back on a last resort. So even if all goes wrong, it can always be righted without question.

  2. Ant
    Ant says:

    That means there are more people who are corrupted even big shots. I heard that when we join for the job for the first time we do get TA/DA till we reach the working place. We called my friends and asked about it. All my friends got that but we didnt get and its almost 2 years now why its happening like this. Dont we deserv it or not given?

  3. logical
    logical says:

    “Citing the legal provisions of the Constitution, the Civil Service Act of Bhutan, 2010, and the Bhutan Civil Service Rules and Regulations, 2012, the commission had informed the Cabinet that, “the three Secretaries in question will remain on authorised absence with benefits until the matter is resolved.”

    Sibidai observes: “Cabinet submitting report to RCSC connotes that the Cabinet – the law making body of Bhutan – is subservient to a branch organ of the government it presides over”. To logical sense, the law making body is not a bullying power but responsible institution that wields authority over the rest to rule with existing laws or guide with consistent policy. It has moral and legal power by existing rules to deal with any issue. It can draft new rules if there are none to deal any new situation arising in course of time or if the old rules have to be amended. As such, it is MOST HONOURABLE on their part submitting details against the secretaries to RCSC for appropriate action without violating the existing provision. This state is not subservience but further illumination and guidance to RCSC for right action.

    Were you expecting cabinet to be a TYRANNICAL ORGANISATION by virtue of being in that level even in serious democracy?

  4. sibidai
    sibidai says:

    Cabinet submitting report to RCSC connotes that the Cabinet – the law making body of Bhutan – is subservient to a branch organ of the government it presides over.
    Many may not realise it now but this incident has effectively established a precedent which is going to have big fall back on the role and supremeness of Parliament and PM’s Cabinet in coming years.
    It also shows our parliamentarians have educational degrees but lack education on parliament’s status and knowledge of its standing in any government structure.
    This incident has definitely exposes the topsy-turvy nature of Bhutanese Democracy.

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